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Tag Archives: PDD-NOS

Light It Up Blue

Jess from Diary of a Mom wrote a letter to our president, asking him to Light the White House Blue.  It is an eloquent and beautifully written letter and it is in the White House as I type this.  Not yet in the hands of President Obama, but hopefully soon. 

We have about a week.

We need your help, if you haven’t commented on the letter please go here ——> Letter and do so. 

President Obama needs to see that Autism affects so many families in the US.  Statistics are one thing but our voices, united together, are so much more powerful.  I thank you in advance 🙂

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Empathy

Last night everything was back to normal, well as normal as things have been these days. 

I was sitting on the couch, reading the program from our nephew’s funeral, unfortunately I couldn’t attend and was seeking some sort of connection.  Everything around me faded into the background as I looked at the picture of Johnathan’s beautiful 18-year-old face, the beautiful face that was shot twice.  As type this I still can’t believe it has happened.  Diego brought me out of my trance by asking me “why my eyes were sweating.”

The following exchange ensued.

Me: ” Well Diego mommy is crying because she is sad.”

D: “Why are you sad mommy?”

(Did you all catch the WH question??  Ok I thought so 🙂 )

Me:  “D mommy is sad because our nephew passed away”

D: ” Passed away??”

Me: ” He died baby” *crying again*

D: ” How??”

It was obviously not appropriate to break down how Johnathan was shot dead in front of his grandmother’s house.  I was scrambling, but finally came up with…

Me:  “D he was hurt very bad, but he is ok now, he is in heaven with God smiling down on us.”

I’m not even sure how much I believe that statement as my faith continues to take a nose dive, but I wanted to reassure D.

D: “Oh…Mommy I am a little bit sad too.”

Me: ” Why honey?”

D: ” Because you are sad.”

Diego was empathetic, not only was he empathetic but he asked questions and held the topic of conversation (a very emotional conversation).

We have had bursts of progress, but nothing this major. 

I looked at Rickey and mouthed “did you hear that?!”  he just smiled and nodded.  I explained to Diego that it was normal to feel sad when someone was sad and then he was off to tackle his brother

We NEEDED this so bad. 

Japan, Libya, 2,000 laid of district employees (880 of them teachers), cuts to the regional centers, gas prices through the roof, our nephew’s murder, Rickey’s mother (one of the most amazing people I know) is slowly entering the final stage of her life.

It is all so damn heavy.

But in the midst of all of that, there was hope last night.

I am thankful for that.

On a different note the NFAR Race For Autism is this Saturday and if you feel inclined to do so please donate to the cause.  The link is below 🙂

Go Diego Go

A Special Needs Tribe

Every second and fourth Friday at my clinic is our epilepsy clinic, these patients have seizures that require the care of two world-renowned epileptologists. 

It isn’t a coincidence that a lot of these adults are developmentally delayed and due to tragically long wait times in our clinic, I get a lot of time to get to know the caregivers and parents of my patients. 

I get to speak with moms that have raised their wonderful children in a time when there was little to no support, I envy their strength.  We compare stories, services, bad times, and good times. 

I always end our conversations by telling each mom that she is doing an amazing job, each time I say it, one or both of us cries. 

Every second and fourth friday I am surrounded by people who ‘get it’, they get the good days, the bad days, the fear, and the hope. 

My mission on these days is to be a shoulder, an ear to vent to, and to let them know that I will make sure that their children are medically taken care of.

I ‘get it.’ 

We are a tribe of parents with children that have special needs.

After these clinics my level of emotional exhaustion varies,and it is always directly connected to what is going on in my home. 

I found myself in tears yesterday as the mother of a young man with severe autism and I shared stories of  “when one thing seems to be resolved, another thing gets thrown at you.”

Another mother that has two boys with Downs Syndrome started crying when I told her that her boys are the highlight of my day when they come in and that she has done a great job.  She tried to brush off the compliment by saying “she just does her best” so I grabbed her hand and told her she that has raised two amazing young men (seriously I love them!). 

We hugged and cried for a long time.

We need to hear this.   The dark times are so dark for most of us and even the wonderful times seem to be tempered with a sense of foreboding.

When I got home after workmI logged onto Facebook and  Beth had reposted a blog entry by MOM-NOS on Hopeful Parents. 

 Just in time.

ANYONE who knows ANYONE that is raising a child with special needs, should read it.

Seriously.

Here is the link.

Thank you MOM-NOS for being so courageous and helping the rest of us put words to what we feel.  You have done something amazing.

Keeping The Lanterman Promise

You can find me up on my soapbox over at Hopeful Parents 🙂

“You can’t wring your hands and roll up your sleeves at the same time.”~P. Schroeder

Overwhelmed would be an understatement, but the closest word to describe the past few weeks. 

The details of everything would bore anyone, just because it would be too damn long to read.  But I need to get at least part of it out, so here is the condensed version.

In addition to running an entire clinic, with minimal help (see staff shortage and the hospital’s tragically long  hiring process), Diego has had me in the ER and doctors offices a lot more than we typically are.  In he past D has had some abnormal test findings for his brain and DNA, but typically we don’t visit the doctor ‘doctor’ this much.   

The abnormal brain finding shows that the part of his brain responsible for his visual motor skills  is being pressed against by two dilated perivascular spaces, so he will have to work harder in an area where he already has difficulty due to his autism. 

His DNA shows  a balanced translocation and chromosome deletions that currently have ‘undetermined clinical significance’ (aka waiting on research to catch up) and now we can add a benign abnormal heart rhythm with possible premature atrial contractions or the benign abnormal heat rhythm with panic attacks.  The brain and chromosomes are old news for us as it has been a few months.  The heart is new and is what has kept me running around (even more so than usual) like a chicken with her head cut off.  We are currently waiting to see the cardiologist to hopefully give him a clean bill of health, other than the arrhythmia.  While I am hopeful that what is going on has nothing to do with his heart, it breaks mine to think that my baby at the age of 5, is having panic attacks. 

Diego is verbal, but he still has a very hard time with his expressive (and pragmatic) language.  Anyone that has experienced an irregular heart rate can attest to the fact that it causes one to be more aware of what their heart is doing and usually causes alarm, even if one already knows that it is due to caffeine, etc…

But I think that when it happens to Diego in addition to the usual things that assault his senses, it is all too much and ends in a panic attack :(. 

I am almost positive this isn’t a cardiac issue, Diego’s anxiety is constantly through the roof.  If it isn’t a cardiac issue and is an anxiety issue, I am sure someone is going to hint to an anti anxiety med for him.  To possibly avoid any new medications, I am going to work with him on new relaxation techniques and how to apply them when his heart rhythm changes.  I will still obviously work on recognizing and expressing the anxiety, but the heart rhythm is tangible and my little concrete thinker will hopefully apply the relaxation techniques that I teach him are “for when his heart acts funny”.  I really don’t want him on anymore meds. 

Behavior has also been an issue, we were tweaking his Risperdal dose (not causing the heart issues I checked 🙂 ) and his beahvior was just escalating.  After emailing Beth and Kim (Thank you both for being amazing) and hearing about their medication experiences it was all too obvious that I needed to take him back down. 

So I did. 

I was  increasing it on our Neuro recommendation to hopefully decrease the frequency of meltdowns, especially since it had already provided some slightly positive results with the intensity of his meltdowns (aka his self injurious behavior).  I am going to take the behavior we have now, it is an improvement, even if not ideal.  We will also continue to try techniques that aren’t medicine.

The increase had me ready to enter the loony bin and probably poor D too. 

I am going to end this with a plea to you all.  California is proposing a 750 million dollar cut to DDS services, as a result of this they are trying to impose new guidelines for services that would violate our children’s rights under The Lanterman Act.  The DDS has posted a survey for parental feedback and of course the questions are just difficult enough to try and discourage us from answering. 

KTLP has posted responses to the questions as a guideline for parents, this is listed after the survey link below.  Please follow the link below, complete the survey and help us advocate for our babies. 

I spent 16 months fighting to get D into the regional center, I needed help paying for the very expensive ABA therapy that D needed, that is all I wanted from them as my insurance has covered most everything else (after some pushing on my part).   Thankfully he was finally qualified for services two months ago, but there is still a lot of red tape to navigate until he gets his ABA therapy, possibly costing us another precious few months.

That was 16 months he could have been getting ABA by a behaviorist….not mom, but because we couldn’t afford to hire someone and The Regional Cener screened us out (due to their ‘standards’) with no compassion, we lost that precious time. These new ‘standards’ that they are trying to impose on POS services will hurt the development of a lot of our children. 

Thank You 🙂

Here is the link for the survey,

http://www.dds.ca.gov/survey/

From the KTLP Website:

Statewide POS Standards will KILL the promise of The Lanterman Act. If you want to stop this, we suggest you answer the DDS Survey something like this:

Question #1: Suggested service standards about who should receive these services:
Answer: Those individuals whose Individual Program Plan (IPP) team has identified a need for these services, as described in The Lanterman Act Section 4646 (a) – (d).

Question #2: Suggested service standards about how often a specific service should be provided:
Answer: As often as the IPP team determines is necessary, as described in The Lanterman Act Section 4646.5 (a) (4).

Question #3: Suggested service standards about how to make sure the services provided are useful and effective:
Answer: Usefulness and effectiveness of services should be determined by the IPP Team at every IPP meeting, as described in The Lanterman Act Section 4646.5 (a) (6).

Question #4: Suggested service standards about the qualifications and performance of the person or organization that provides these services:
Answer: Services should be provided only by persons or organization that are properly vendorized as described in The Lanterman Act Section 4648 (a) (3) (A).

Question #5: Suggested service standards about the payment for these services:
Answer: The Lanterman Act, in Sections 4648 (a) (5) and 4690 requires the Director of the Department of Developmental Services to develop and maintain equitable processes for setting rates to assure that Regional Centers can secure high quality services for persons with developmental disabilities. The Director should comply with these laws.

Question #6: Suggested service standards about the responsibility of parents and consumers for these services, e.g., co-payment, time commitment, etc.
Answer: The State of California has accepted a responsibility for persons with developmental disabilities and an obligation to them which it must discharge. (The Lanterman Act Section 4501). The state does not ask parents and students for co-pays in California’s pubic schools and the same logic applies here.

Question #7: Suggested service standards about self-directed or self-determination options for these services:
This question cannot be answered until California has a clearly defined mechanism for implementing self-directed or self-determination options.

It Shouldn’t Be This Hard

7:45pm rolled around earlier this evening and found me at home with my stomach in knots. 

D had a rough day today.  In fact today was one of the worst days we have had in a while. 

EVERYTHING required ten times more effort than it should have. Diego’s frustration threshold was the lowest that I have seen it since he started the Risperdal. 

When he has hard days like today, in addition to the major lack of impulse control, he walks around with a pained expression on his face and his language is out the door.  When I try to talk to him, his replies are brief…fragmented…or he will start to ramble at a frantic pace about dinosaurs, his guinea pig Chum Chum, or the dog he has at his father’s house…Hazel. 

So my plan was to be as cheerful as I could when I announced that it was time for bed. As I walked up to him he threw himself on the ground and yelled “NO BED!”. I had hoped that the timer would help a bit, but it hadn’t. 

I was in for a long one tonight.   

I ignored D’s yelling and laid out his PJ’s and his pull-up so that they were easier for him to put on.  Once he saw them laid out his immediate reponse was “can’t do it.”  I tried to encouraged him, I told  him that he was such a big boy, I told him that he was a pro at putting his pajamas on, but nothing worked.  His anxiety was through the roof and he needed to control something.  Part of me just wanted to dress him for bed to avoid the meltdown,  but I knew that I couldn’t do that. 

Diego knows how to put his PJ’s on and I would be rewarding bad behavior if I had done it for him. 

It is my job to teach him that disruptive behavior isn’t ok.

So I had to hold my ground. 

Unfortunately this gave me the pleasure of scrambling for ways to motivate him to get them on. 

He haphazardly tried and would cry out “my hands can’t do it!!!”

I cheated a little bit and helped him here and there. My logic was that maybe if I gave him a little control that  it would calm him enough to put the shirt on by himself.  Finally he was ready, and then he looked at me and said ‘snack’

I don’t think that I have mentioned Diego’s obsession with snack food on here yet.  Getting him to eat a real meal is virtually impossible.  Initially I thought it was the Risperdal causing an increased appetite, but when I took a minute to think about it, D’s snack obsession was budding  prior to the Risperdal.  To manage the obsession, we set a number of snacks that he can have before and after meals.  I know it sounds drastic, but I make sure that he is getting enough to eat, and have found that it is  the only way he will stop asking for a ‘snack’ every 5 minutes.

I’m not exaggerating. 

Every 5 minutes.

Tonight I told him that he could have 3 snacks before bed. The amount varies based on how much he ate for at meal time, if he barely eats then we increase the number of snacks. 

He had all 3 snacks.

When I reminded him about this, he lost it.  I caved a bit and offered a few animal crackers, but he didn ‘t want those, he wanted a fruit leather. 

We were out. 

Of course.

When I told him this he started crying louder.  I offered the animal crackers again but he wasn’t having it.  At this point it was obvious that nothing was going to make things better and I walked him to his bedroom.  I let go of his hand and went to turn his blanket down and that’s when he started smacking and punching himself in the face.  I held his hands down  so that he wouldn’t hurt himself and ‘ignored’ the rest of the tantrum.  After a few minutes he stopped trying to hit himself and calmed enough for me to kiss him goodnight.  Once I left his room and sat on the couch,  I allowed my body and mind to relax. Nights like this drain every bit of emotional energy I have.  They leave me very tired and so sad.  About ten minutes later the crying started again, I let it go until I heard him smack himself.  When I walked into his bedroom he was banging  his knee into his nose and eye, he told me he wanted to see his blood. I was at the point where I didn’t give a shit about rewarding bad behavior, I just wanted him to stop.  I crawled into bed next him and gave him some deep pressure input by wrapping his blanket as tight as I could around his body.  Eventually this calmed him enough for me to cuddle next to him.  He kept crying and saying that he ‘didn’t want to hurt himself but that he couldn’t make his brain stop.’ 

It broke my heart to hear him say this.

I didn’t say anything to his comment, I mean what am I supposed to reply with in that emotional moment?  I think that I will address it with his therapist and see if she recommends anything. 

Without  words I  kissed him on his forehead and let him rub my ears until he fell asleep.

There is no moral or real point to this entry tonight.

I just needed to get this out.

It shouldn’t be this hard, it just shouldn’t.

My Own ‘Special’ Groundhog Day

Remember that movie “Groundhog Day” starring Bill Murray?

I was up late one night over the weekend and I came to the conclusion that my life goes on cyclically…..

Like Bill in Groundhog Day.

Follow me.

This is going somewhere.

I promise.

I go on about the things that happen in my life as if they were the norm.  I drive D to various appointments all week, make and use visual schedules, implement sensory diet while trying to keep it interesting (read The Out of Sync Child), practice Diego’s fine and gross motor exercises with him , prompting, social skills practice, you name it we are doing it at some point…these things along with all other things that encompass  mom, wife, and employee are the norm for me.

Sure it is a lot, but it is just how we get down in our house 🙂

It is typical for me to play phone/ email tag with at least 2 member of D’s team weekly. 

Typical to spend many nights….awake….thinking…..worrying…..crying. 

Typical to be stretched very thin and still feel like I haven’t done enough. 

Like there is always something more.

Something I could do better.

Anyway these days pass almost effortlessly for my family (and I’m assuming most of you that are reading this) as we have worked out a rhythm with our nutso schedule.

But…

every so often?

SMACK!!!!

It dawns on me that the way we live isnt typical or very easy for that matter.

Other families have traded our therapies therapy for sports or dance classes, can spontaneously take their child anywhere without thinking about how it sounds, looks, or smells before even really fully entertaining the idea, or may overlook the  little things like “please’ and ‘thank you’ coming out of a 6 year old’s mouth.

I mean why should that be significant to the parent of a typical six year-old child?

I didn’t think anything of it when Lyric spontaneously used his manners at 2. 

It was the way it should be.

Ha!

The way things should be??

Silly naive girl..

Fast forward to today, we are going on 6 and still not getting a ‘please’ or ‘thank you’ unless he is prompted….many times.

I don’t write this with any animosity toward the parents of typical children, so I hope that it doesn’t come off that way.

But I would be a big fat liar if I didn’t blog about the reality of my life and of parents that are  in the same boat as I am.

My child has autism.

MY

CHILD

HAS

AUTISM

We are the 1-110 statistic.

Holy

Shit.

When this dose of reality hits me, I am taken right back to the first day I really knew that D had autism and then I experience every single thing I felt that day all over again.

the

despair

shock

sadness

and

the suffocating  fear

have to be dealt with all over again.

Like Bill Murray in Groundhog Day, I try to meet these difficult days with a different approach each time, hoping that I have finally found a way not to let the realization of our autism diagnosis ruin me (as it threatens to do each time this happens).

As time passes some things are so much easier and I see how far our family has come.

But I just can’t seem to get out of this cycle. 

I can’t stop experiencing my own ‘special’ type of groundhog day

I wonder if it will stop?

Am I still in some sort of denial about D’s autism diagnosis?

I have spent so much time this past year, trying to get people to listen to me, to help me help Diego, that I don’t think that I have taken a lot of time to entirely process it all within myself. 

Maybe it is really too much for any of us to process at one time…maybe someone bigger than me knows that I need these lapses of full reality.

*sigh*

I am sorry if this sounds bleak, depressing, or anything along those lines, but I remember a year ago that I promised myself that I would be candid and true to myself while writing this blog. 

So that is what I’m doing 🙂