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Who Runs The World??

Me: *singing* “Who runs the world?!” *shouting* “GIRLS!!!!”

D: *shouting* “BOYS!!”

Occasionally Lyric’s moody teenager self will join in the silliness. 

Then we all laugh!

Every time this song comes on in the car the above scenario plays out.  But recently I started thinking,  am I doing all I can to teach Diego that men and women are equal??

Like most autistics, D is a very black and white thinker, grey areas are difficult for him. 

Due to his very traditional (dare I say slightly ignorant) father, cartoons, and the media,  D has adopted the thought process that generally boys are better than girls.  

After one of our singing sessions, I came up with a plan to show Diego that men and women are equal.  It would have to be good and convincing because this can be a grey area in Diego’s eyes, especially when he is being  flooded with ideas to the contrary. 

*sigh*

I won’t even go on my rant about how frustrating it is to see the enormous amount of sexism and misogyny in the media and how nobody really ever takes issue with it…I won’t.

Not here.

Anyhow I started the equality discussion with Lyric when he was about 4, and it still continues everyday.  So one evening I sat down with D and talked about how men and women can do the same job.  He looked at me and said “no girls can’t do boys’ jobs because they are not strong!”  So I pulled out our iPad and on YouTube and showed him videos of male nurses, female construction workers, male receptionists,  and female car mechanics.  With each video his eyes got wider.  I explained that a lot of people  think that girls are not as strong as boys, but that really isn’t true.  I talked to him about how his Nana is awesome at building things and how his “twin friend” Tomas’ favorite color is pink.  I could almost hear the wheels in his head turning.  After I was done, he didn’t have much to say. 

He stood up, walked over to his Legos, while muttering “OK.”

Not sure if I got my point across I made a mental note to broach the subject briefly in our everyday conversations. 

A few days later our silly song “Run The World” came on and this time after “Who runs the world?!”

Diego responded “BOTH!!!!!!!!!!”

=)

Hope Is In Short Supply These Days

Cynthia (our ABA therapist/saint) and I decided that it was time for her to help me get  Diego to change out of his uniform after school.  I can’t seem to get him to allow me to do it (or anything..really), let alone ask him to do it himself.  It isn’t a matter of his ability to physically perform the action of dressing, it is a matter of overcoming his anxiety.  The anxiety (esp since school has started) makes him incredibly rigid, which then turns into a huge protest and then a self-injurious melt down.  When Cynthia arrived yesterday I warned her about what she was in for and asked when I should intervene. 

I trust her, she has helped us so much and has a heart of gold. 

She said that if she needed me that she would peek out and grab me, I told her not to worry that I would be right by the door. 

D was already protesting as they walked over to his bedroom, I knew this was going to be major.

I went and sat on the couch, D’s bedroom is right by the living room so I could hear everything. 

Which was both a good and bad thing.

D immediately started screaming and crying “NO I CAN”T GET DRESSED!!!!”

Cynthia calmly told him that he could do it, she tried to use her reinforcers, and tried to negotiate.

The situation just got worse….much worse 

Diego then began screaming “Mommy help me please!!. My mommy always helps me!!!!!!!!!!.”

It took every ounce of strength I had not to run in there.

 He needs to overcome this rigidity that keeps him from doing so much and nothing I am doing is working.

I HAVE to let Cynthia try. 

The screaming continued, he started to hyperventilate…I could hear every breath, every hiccup, every yelp.  Then he began to hit himself and kick the walls.  I could hear Cynthia’s calm voice telling him that it was ok, and that she was there to help him.  That once he was just a little bit calmer, she would call me in to help him.

This same pattern of behavior went on for about ten minutes while I sat crying on my couch.

I have never felt as helpless as I have for the past two months.  This same type of melt down happens multiple times everyday.  What I find amazing is how he verbalizes how he his feeling during these times. 

He will scream and cry “I want to calm down but my brain won’t listen, my body hates me that’s why it hurts me, I am trying very hard not hit you mommy!!!”  His body is tense, face splotchy and red, and he is typically on the brink of hyperventilating.

and I can’t do a f*cking thing to help.

Not

one

thing

Cynthia finally peeked out and I ran into his room, he was drenched in sweat and hysterical.  I scooped him up in my arms, hugged and rocked  him.  We laid in his bed and I rubbed his head, repeating over and over  “it’s ok, mommy is here to help you”.  I also told him that Cynthia and Stella want to help him too. 

After about 5 minutes his breathing was a bit more regular and the crying had subsided.  I gave it another 5 minutes before revisiting the task of undressing.  I told him that if he can just take ONE sock off that I will do the rest.  He protested in the beginning, but I told him that we could do it together.  He eventually took the sock off, and I praised him like he won an Oscar,and  I meant it.  Because for me….Diego removing one sock, FEELS like he won an Oscar.

Things finally calmed down and at this point Stella the ABA supervisor had arrived .  Cynthia  filled her in on what happened and we all agreed that the rest of the session would have to demand less from Diego.  Stella began to play Dinosaurs with D and Cynthia and I went to talk in the kitchen.  She gave me the run down of what happened in the bedroom and there were  tears in her eyes as she said “It is so hard to watch him like that.  You can tell he is trying so hard to get it together.” 

So of course this opened the flood gates for me, I excused myself and went to the bathroom.

The rest of the session went on without any more major meltdowns. 

Stella came up with a new plan to reduce the demand and use the token/reward system for EVERYTHING he does. 

I listened and I will do it all,  but honestly I am not incredibly hopeful.

Hope is in very short supply these days.

I always try to be so PC about autism, but you know what?

I hate autism, I absolutely despise it.

Do The Best You Can and Never Stop

Diego’s first day at the “Big School” is Monday. I have spent the months since our IEP meeting preparing him for Monday and have been in constant contact with our team from the school.
Last week we visited the school numerous times, and I can’t even begin to express how much everyone at that school is invested in Diego’s success.
So why can’t I get this knot out of my stomach??
I have come to expect these knots as the parent of a child with autism.
They….Just….Don’t….Go….Away..
His teacher this year is amazing and his private school teacher ended up getting hired at the “big School” and she has been such an amazing resource for everybody there. I have even prepared for Diego to have a 1:1 aide for the after school program if he needs it.
But I still feel like I am missing something, although I know I am not.
My ‘I’s are dotted and my ‘T’s are crossed.
My blog has been severely neglected and I miss it so much.
Things at home have taken precedence over everything, and it isn’t just D.
Lyric is a tween almost teen and is acting every bit of it, not to mention his absent father of ten years has come back in his life. Which in the long run is great, but makes everything so much more complicated. As Lyric’s mom I am doing everything I can to facilitate this relationship, no matter how hard it is for me.
He wants this and deserves it.
I did find out a couple of days ago that Lyric scored advanced on all of his standardized testing, which made me feel great.
Like I am achieving the balance of being his and D’s mom.
I love them both so very much
Diego’s father and I have been civil, which is amazing considering how bad things have been in the past between us. But he is still heavily in denial about D’s autism. He noticed D can’t ride a scooter and decided that it was my fault, because I don’t take him to the park enough
*sigh*
When I attempted to explain that the scooter issue was more due to his gross motor delay than a lack of park outings, he told me that there is nothing wrong with Diego. I told him that I agree that there is nothing “wrong” with our son, but that he does a have autism and that includes different kinds of delays. He disagreed with that as well.
So instead of attempting to convince him otherwise I just listened, thanked him for his opinion, and politely explained that I will keep listening to the experts with extensive knowledge about autism (which include myself).
Diego started ABA in July and I already see tiny signs of progress, we also switched meds and I believe that is helping as well. He has been having some issues with his eyes though and I am taking him to the opthamologist in a week. I hope it is just his allergies and nothing else.
My husband is grieving and it is a deep grief that seems to changing the core of who he is. I wish I could write about the implications of it all here, but he doesn’t do public and if he gets wind that i did, it will just make a very difficult situation so much worse.
So I won’t.
To say my plate is full wouldn’t even cover the magnitude of the things I am facing.
I don’t have much support right now, which makes everything just seem so much harder. The needs and wants of those close to me currently trump my own, and that is ok for my boys, but not the others.
Too bad they haven’t gotten that memo.
But I haven’t set any boundaries either…..it is hard to do that with people you love.
I did take a break for myself and went with a group of friends to Vegas for a weekend. It was interesting, as the last time Iwas in Vegas was ten years ago, but it really isn’t my bag. My sister kept both of the boys and I was so grateful because she is one of the few people I can leave them with and not have to worry for a second. She is amazing and I am blessed to have her.
I have started seeing a therapist, it has been a long time coming.
I will be 31 in a week or so and have promised myself that I will finish my nursing degree, even if I am an old lady when I finally finish.
I need to do it for myself.
I also think I need to make blogging more important than it has been.
It is my way of getting all of this out.
Expect a post about the first day of school soon and good luck to everyone on their first day back as well!

IMFAR Part 2

Once Alex was done interviewing , we walked back to grab some coffee.  As we walked around this part of the conference, I felt like I was in Disneyland.  I met a man that invented a vest that works similarly to Temple Grandin’s Hug Machine, I came across fMRI’s and  fancy EEG’s, but what stood out most to me was the level of comfort to just be.  This conference was filled with people who ‘got it’ whether on the spectrum or not.  It was so beautiful to watch, and I couldn’t help but to fantasize about a world like that.  A world that doesn’t notice the difference but does notice all of the amazing things inside the person.  Speaking of amazing things, back to the story. 

Alex and Noah needed to edit some video and after Susan, Adam and I found some food we headed over to the video room to join them.  Susan and I sat down and talked while the guys were intently focused on editing.  After a while I walked over and checked out some of the videos and couldn’t help but gush about how professional it all was, especially on the “G-string budget”

Did I mention that Alex has a fantastic sense of humor?!?!

He does.

All of the guys did.

It was getting later in the morning and I had to get home, but REALLY didn’t want to leave.  I gave myself another hour and I am glad I did. Susan and I met a woman with four children (one or more on the spectrum) getting her doctorate.  I have no clue how she is managing it, but she is and I think that it is fantastic.  I met a young man (in his teens)  who had won a trip to the conference and he was absolutely charming.  I also met a wonderful woman from Autism Speaks, please forgive me for not knowing everyone’s name.  I was so doped up on cold medicine that morning that I am surprised I remember half of what happened. (a week later my cold turned into pneumonia…blah)  Then the next thing I knew John Elder Robison walked in.

Seriously!!! 

He and Alex discussed the conference and what exactly Alex had gotten on video that morning.  One of my favorite parts, was when John told Alex, Adam and Noah how proud he was of them. 

I just wanted to hug them all!

But I restrained myself….LOL

I did watch John give the guys this amazing lesson on microphone frequencies and how fast sound traveled.  It was amazing to watch all of their brilliant minds at work. 

Simply amazing. 

I did everything I could not to cry as I thought about all of the challenges associated with autism that our children face that can sometimes cloud how incredible their minds are.  But I was also hopeful watching the four of them working together (some on the spectrum and some not.)  It was a great dynamic to witness. I did get a chance to talk to John and I thanked him for writing “Look Me In The Eye” and also explained that it was my first peek into what Diego’s world might look like.  He was fantastic about it as I’m sure that I was talking way too fast 🙂

Susan and I spent some more time talking, she is doing amazing things for people on the spectrum transitioning out of high school and into college.  When it was time for me to leave, I was bursting with love and hope.  I got to see and hear that the hard times do get better. 

The biggest thing that stood out to me was that I felt like I was with “my people”.  I never had to explain what the acronyms I was using meant, or give my quick  break down on autism.

Everyone there just knew.  It was great!

I am so thankful to Susan, Alex, Adam, Noah, John, and every other person I met for such a life changing experience.

IMFAR Part 1

The IMFAR Conference was held in San Diego a few weeks ago.  Susan, who blogs over at Taking The Awe Out of Autism ,wrote to me on FB and said she was coming down to attend the conference and we arranged to meet up for drinks.    There are so many women that blog that I have developed friendships with and each one of them is amazing, the great thing about the internet is that it doesn’t matter how far you are from each other.  There is still this amazing “autism mom” connection that we all seem to have.  With that being said most of them live pretty far from where I am and I was super excited because I would actually get to meet a woman I admired so much in person!  We arranged to meet up that Friday night for drinks.  Friday comes and of course it is the day from hell! Work was a nightmare, then after work I had to shoot to D’s new elementary school to observe the special day class (which deserves an entirely separate blog), and then race to pick up the boys (on opposite ends of town) to get home in time to meet with the behaviorist to finish D’s evaluation.  On top of everything else I felt like I was getting sick. 7 o’clock  rolls around and Diego is at the tail end of an awful day, I wasn’t too concerned because my sister was coming to watch the boys and if anything makes D happy, it is his Titi.  My sister showed up and Diego was still struggling, bedtime had been particularly rough. My head was pounding and D’s yelling and screaming just made the evening that much worse.  I made the decision to text message Susan and ask to reschedule, I just couldn’t make it.  We ended up deciding on breakfast the next morning, I was so happy that it worked out because I had really been looking forward to seeing her.  Saturday morning came and I dropped off both kids with family and headed down to the hotel to meet Susan for breakfast.  I had no clue she was staying at the actual hotel that was hosting some of the IMFAR conference.  We met down in the lobby and I felt like I had known her forever, she is such a lovely person.  As we were walking upstairs she mentioned something about “meeting up with Alex”, at that point my mind raced back to a text message from her on Friday that said “Alex and John may come too”, I didn’t give it much thought at the time because things were so nuts.  But when she mentioned it while walking upstairs I started to wonder who Alex was. 

Because it sure sounded like should have known. 🙂

When we got upstairs I was intriduced to Adam and all three of us grabbed some food from the continental breakfast area.  Adam and Susan were discussing ALex’s wherabouts and then it hit me! Susan and Adam were referring  Alex Plank, the young gentleman that runs Wrong Planet!  Wrong Planet is an amazing web community of people with neurological differences. 

WOW! 

LOL…Yeah I said WOW!!  I was really excited to meet him!  Before I go further let me explain something, when D was first diagnosed I was scouring the internet for hope, I desperately needed to know that another person like my child grew up to be happy and successful.  I found Alex Plank and John Elder Robison.  These two men’s stories were the first glimmers of hope during an incredibly dark time.  So to know that I would be meeting one of them in person was so exciting! 

But I kept my cool 🙂

We walked over to the an empty hotel room that was being used as a video room.   Kind of like a headquarters for  Alex,Noah and Adam while they were filming coverage of the conference for Autism Speaks. When we walked into the room, Alex and Noah were very busy gathering this cord and that mic, so I just tried to stay out of the way.  Susan introduced me to Alex and Noah and we all said hello and then it was back to business.  Alex was interviewing a young woman about her research with autism phenotypes and it was time to go meet with her.  Susan, Adam and I followed Alex and Noah, while Alex was interviewing the young woman the rest of us walked off to look at all of the amazing research that is being done to help our children and chat.  I was floored to see the enormous amount of science and dedication going into helping everyone  better understand poeple on the spectrum.  Seeing it all  gave me so much hope.  Susan gave me some amazing advice and we shared stories.  Adam mentioned that it was interesting to hear the mother’s side of autism.  We smiled and looked at each other, we are in the trenches every day, we don’t know anything else.  

I have so much more to write but it is too much to read or write in one sitting, so I am going to use Jess’ great idea of breaking this story up a bit!!  Stay tuned for part two of  my amazing Saturday morning experience!

Miss Kelly

Last night Diego had his Open House. 

Once we got home my Facebook status read:

“My baby stood up in front of 50 parents, spoke 3 lines and made it through both songs. He and his wonderful teacher Ms Kelly are amazing! Never underestimate the power of a teacher that cares. I am forever grateful to her.”

Despite the sensory nightmare that was last night Diego managed to get through the entire evening with out melting down once, and he even participated in the performance.  He looked pained through a lot of it, but he got through like a champ.  The first thing Kelly said to me after they got off stage was “HE DID IT!!!”. 

I just cried and thanked her.

When I first met with Miss Kelly, I was pretty positive that she wasn’t going to be a good fit for Diego.  She came off  immature, slightly arrogant, and would cut me off before I was done with my sentences.  I would soon learn that I was very wrong.  I think she may have thought that I was crazy overbearing psycho mom. 

Maybe I am a little bit 🙂

During the  first month of school Kelly and I hit a few bumps.  But after that first month, Miss Kelly fell in love with Diego (her words).   She knows how to manage Diego and the plethora of behaviors that he comes with.  I take comfort in knowing that Diego is ok when he is with her. 

Emails like this prove to me everyday that we are incredibly blessed to have her as his teacher:

Super day! Diego had EXCELLENT restaurant manners and was such a good kid : )Loved his share too…. only that little guy would find a way to bring sea animals and the world together ; ) Loved it!”

and

Great day Shivon! I can’t express how much I love that little guy and how his silly little faces and smiles get me through the day.  Today I asked him if he would stay in Kindergarten forever and he gladly replied, “Sure!”

and

“D was a trooper today- K let me know about his early pickup and I forgot to remind R before I went to lunch.  My heart dropped when Diego already had on his green fieldtrip shirt and was sleepily walking to use the restroom when I came back from my break.  LUCKILY, he wasn’t phased at all when I informed him that you were getting him early! Looks like our little man is adjusting better to change : )”

She is such a gift.

I thank her every time I talk to her, because I feel like my simple words just aren’t adequate enough to convey the depth of my gratitude to her.  To prepare for next year she has even offered to accompany me to Diego’s IEP meeting.  I expressed to her that I didn’t want her to lose pay as she will be missing work to attend and she looked me square in the eye and said “I want to be there”. 

Once this school year ends I will miss having her as Diego’s teacher , but am happy knowing that we will always have her as our friend 🙂

Light It Up Blue

Jess from Diary of a Mom wrote a letter to our president, asking him to Light the White House Blue.  It is an eloquent and beautifully written letter and it is in the White House as I type this.  Not yet in the hands of President Obama, but hopefully soon. 

We have about a week.

We need your help, if you haven’t commented on the letter please go here ——> Letter and do so. 

President Obama needs to see that Autism affects so many families in the US.  Statistics are one thing but our voices, united together, are so much more powerful.  I thank you in advance 🙂

Keeping The Lanterman Promise

You can find me up on my soapbox over at Hopeful Parents 🙂

“You can’t wring your hands and roll up your sleeves at the same time.”~P. Schroeder

Overwhelmed would be an understatement, but the closest word to describe the past few weeks. 

The details of everything would bore anyone, just because it would be too damn long to read.  But I need to get at least part of it out, so here is the condensed version.

In addition to running an entire clinic, with minimal help (see staff shortage and the hospital’s tragically long  hiring process), Diego has had me in the ER and doctors offices a lot more than we typically are.  In he past D has had some abnormal test findings for his brain and DNA, but typically we don’t visit the doctor ‘doctor’ this much.   

The abnormal brain finding shows that the part of his brain responsible for his visual motor skills  is being pressed against by two dilated perivascular spaces, so he will have to work harder in an area where he already has difficulty due to his autism. 

His DNA shows  a balanced translocation and chromosome deletions that currently have ‘undetermined clinical significance’ (aka waiting on research to catch up) and now we can add a benign abnormal heart rhythm with possible premature atrial contractions or the benign abnormal heat rhythm with panic attacks.  The brain and chromosomes are old news for us as it has been a few months.  The heart is new and is what has kept me running around (even more so than usual) like a chicken with her head cut off.  We are currently waiting to see the cardiologist to hopefully give him a clean bill of health, other than the arrhythmia.  While I am hopeful that what is going on has nothing to do with his heart, it breaks mine to think that my baby at the age of 5, is having panic attacks. 

Diego is verbal, but he still has a very hard time with his expressive (and pragmatic) language.  Anyone that has experienced an irregular heart rate can attest to the fact that it causes one to be more aware of what their heart is doing and usually causes alarm, even if one already knows that it is due to caffeine, etc…

But I think that when it happens to Diego in addition to the usual things that assault his senses, it is all too much and ends in a panic attack :(. 

I am almost positive this isn’t a cardiac issue, Diego’s anxiety is constantly through the roof.  If it isn’t a cardiac issue and is an anxiety issue, I am sure someone is going to hint to an anti anxiety med for him.  To possibly avoid any new medications, I am going to work with him on new relaxation techniques and how to apply them when his heart rhythm changes.  I will still obviously work on recognizing and expressing the anxiety, but the heart rhythm is tangible and my little concrete thinker will hopefully apply the relaxation techniques that I teach him are “for when his heart acts funny”.  I really don’t want him on anymore meds. 

Behavior has also been an issue, we were tweaking his Risperdal dose (not causing the heart issues I checked 🙂 ) and his beahvior was just escalating.  After emailing Beth and Kim (Thank you both for being amazing) and hearing about their medication experiences it was all too obvious that I needed to take him back down. 

So I did. 

I was  increasing it on our Neuro recommendation to hopefully decrease the frequency of meltdowns, especially since it had already provided some slightly positive results with the intensity of his meltdowns (aka his self injurious behavior).  I am going to take the behavior we have now, it is an improvement, even if not ideal.  We will also continue to try techniques that aren’t medicine.

The increase had me ready to enter the loony bin and probably poor D too. 

I am going to end this with a plea to you all.  California is proposing a 750 million dollar cut to DDS services, as a result of this they are trying to impose new guidelines for services that would violate our children’s rights under The Lanterman Act.  The DDS has posted a survey for parental feedback and of course the questions are just difficult enough to try and discourage us from answering. 

KTLP has posted responses to the questions as a guideline for parents, this is listed after the survey link below.  Please follow the link below, complete the survey and help us advocate for our babies. 

I spent 16 months fighting to get D into the regional center, I needed help paying for the very expensive ABA therapy that D needed, that is all I wanted from them as my insurance has covered most everything else (after some pushing on my part).   Thankfully he was finally qualified for services two months ago, but there is still a lot of red tape to navigate until he gets his ABA therapy, possibly costing us another precious few months.

That was 16 months he could have been getting ABA by a behaviorist….not mom, but because we couldn’t afford to hire someone and The Regional Cener screened us out (due to their ‘standards’) with no compassion, we lost that precious time. These new ‘standards’ that they are trying to impose on POS services will hurt the development of a lot of our children. 

Thank You 🙂

Here is the link for the survey,

http://www.dds.ca.gov/survey/

From the KTLP Website:

Statewide POS Standards will KILL the promise of The Lanterman Act. If you want to stop this, we suggest you answer the DDS Survey something like this:

Question #1: Suggested service standards about who should receive these services:
Answer: Those individuals whose Individual Program Plan (IPP) team has identified a need for these services, as described in The Lanterman Act Section 4646 (a) – (d).

Question #2: Suggested service standards about how often a specific service should be provided:
Answer: As often as the IPP team determines is necessary, as described in The Lanterman Act Section 4646.5 (a) (4).

Question #3: Suggested service standards about how to make sure the services provided are useful and effective:
Answer: Usefulness and effectiveness of services should be determined by the IPP Team at every IPP meeting, as described in The Lanterman Act Section 4646.5 (a) (6).

Question #4: Suggested service standards about the qualifications and performance of the person or organization that provides these services:
Answer: Services should be provided only by persons or organization that are properly vendorized as described in The Lanterman Act Section 4648 (a) (3) (A).

Question #5: Suggested service standards about the payment for these services:
Answer: The Lanterman Act, in Sections 4648 (a) (5) and 4690 requires the Director of the Department of Developmental Services to develop and maintain equitable processes for setting rates to assure that Regional Centers can secure high quality services for persons with developmental disabilities. The Director should comply with these laws.

Question #6: Suggested service standards about the responsibility of parents and consumers for these services, e.g., co-payment, time commitment, etc.
Answer: The State of California has accepted a responsibility for persons with developmental disabilities and an obligation to them which it must discharge. (The Lanterman Act Section 4501). The state does not ask parents and students for co-pays in California’s pubic schools and the same logic applies here.

Question #7: Suggested service standards about self-directed or self-determination options for these services:
This question cannot be answered until California has a clearly defined mechanism for implementing self-directed or self-determination options.

It Shouldn’t Be This Hard

7:45pm rolled around earlier this evening and found me at home with my stomach in knots. 

D had a rough day today.  In fact today was one of the worst days we have had in a while. 

EVERYTHING required ten times more effort than it should have. Diego’s frustration threshold was the lowest that I have seen it since he started the Risperdal. 

When he has hard days like today, in addition to the major lack of impulse control, he walks around with a pained expression on his face and his language is out the door.  When I try to talk to him, his replies are brief…fragmented…or he will start to ramble at a frantic pace about dinosaurs, his guinea pig Chum Chum, or the dog he has at his father’s house…Hazel. 

So my plan was to be as cheerful as I could when I announced that it was time for bed. As I walked up to him he threw himself on the ground and yelled “NO BED!”. I had hoped that the timer would help a bit, but it hadn’t. 

I was in for a long one tonight.   

I ignored D’s yelling and laid out his PJ’s and his pull-up so that they were easier for him to put on.  Once he saw them laid out his immediate reponse was “can’t do it.”  I tried to encouraged him, I told  him that he was such a big boy, I told him that he was a pro at putting his pajamas on, but nothing worked.  His anxiety was through the roof and he needed to control something.  Part of me just wanted to dress him for bed to avoid the meltdown,  but I knew that I couldn’t do that. 

Diego knows how to put his PJ’s on and I would be rewarding bad behavior if I had done it for him. 

It is my job to teach him that disruptive behavior isn’t ok.

So I had to hold my ground. 

Unfortunately this gave me the pleasure of scrambling for ways to motivate him to get them on. 

He haphazardly tried and would cry out “my hands can’t do it!!!”

I cheated a little bit and helped him here and there. My logic was that maybe if I gave him a little control that  it would calm him enough to put the shirt on by himself.  Finally he was ready, and then he looked at me and said ‘snack’

I don’t think that I have mentioned Diego’s obsession with snack food on here yet.  Getting him to eat a real meal is virtually impossible.  Initially I thought it was the Risperdal causing an increased appetite, but when I took a minute to think about it, D’s snack obsession was budding  prior to the Risperdal.  To manage the obsession, we set a number of snacks that he can have before and after meals.  I know it sounds drastic, but I make sure that he is getting enough to eat, and have found that it is  the only way he will stop asking for a ‘snack’ every 5 minutes.

I’m not exaggerating. 

Every 5 minutes.

Tonight I told him that he could have 3 snacks before bed. The amount varies based on how much he ate for at meal time, if he barely eats then we increase the number of snacks. 

He had all 3 snacks.

When I reminded him about this, he lost it.  I caved a bit and offered a few animal crackers, but he didn ‘t want those, he wanted a fruit leather. 

We were out. 

Of course.

When I told him this he started crying louder.  I offered the animal crackers again but he wasn’t having it.  At this point it was obvious that nothing was going to make things better and I walked him to his bedroom.  I let go of his hand and went to turn his blanket down and that’s when he started smacking and punching himself in the face.  I held his hands down  so that he wouldn’t hurt himself and ‘ignored’ the rest of the tantrum.  After a few minutes he stopped trying to hit himself and calmed enough for me to kiss him goodnight.  Once I left his room and sat on the couch,  I allowed my body and mind to relax. Nights like this drain every bit of emotional energy I have.  They leave me very tired and so sad.  About ten minutes later the crying started again, I let it go until I heard him smack himself.  When I walked into his bedroom he was banging  his knee into his nose and eye, he told me he wanted to see his blood. I was at the point where I didn’t give a shit about rewarding bad behavior, I just wanted him to stop.  I crawled into bed next him and gave him some deep pressure input by wrapping his blanket as tight as I could around his body.  Eventually this calmed him enough for me to cuddle next to him.  He kept crying and saying that he ‘didn’t want to hurt himself but that he couldn’t make his brain stop.’ 

It broke my heart to hear him say this.

I didn’t say anything to his comment, I mean what am I supposed to reply with in that emotional moment?  I think that I will address it with his therapist and see if she recommends anything. 

Without  words I  kissed him on his forehead and let him rub my ears until he fell asleep.

There is no moral or real point to this entry tonight.

I just needed to get this out.

It shouldn’t be this hard, it just shouldn’t.